Thursday, 7 May 2009

Avocado



Health benefits
High avocado intake has been shown to have an effect on blood serum cholesterol levels. Specifically, after a seven day diet rich in avocados, hypercholesterolemia patients showed a 17% decrease in total serum cholesterol levels. These subjects also showed a 22% decrease in both LDL (bad cholesterol) and triglyceride levels and 11% increase in HDL (good cholesterol) levels.[17]
Uses
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Avocado, raw (edible parts)
Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)
Energy 160 kcal 670 kJ
Carbohydrates
8.53 g
- Sugars 0.66 g
- Dietary fiber 6.7 g

Fat
14.66 g
- saturated 2.13 g

- monounsaturated 9.80 g

- polyunsaturated 1.82 g

Protein
2 g
Thiamine (Vit. B1) 0.067 mg
5%
Riboflavin (Vit. B2) 0.130 mg
9%
Niacin (Vit. B3) 1.738 mg
12%
Pantothenic acid (B5) 1.389 mg
28%
Vitamin B6 0.257 mg
20%
Folate (Vit. B9) 81 μg
20%
Vitamin C 10 mg
17%
Calcium 12 mg
1%
Iron 0.55 mg
4%
Magnesium 29 mg
8%
Phosphorus 52 mg
7%
Potassium 485 mg
10%
Zinc 0.64 mg
6%

Percentages are relative to US
recommendations for adults.
Source: USDA Nutrient database

The fruit of horticultural cultivars ranges from more or less round to egg- or pear-shaped, typically the size of a temperate-zone pear or larger, on the outside bright green to green-brown (or almost black) in color. The fruit has a markedly higher fat content than most other fruit, mostly monounsaturated fat, and as such serves as an important staple in the diet of various groups where access to other fatty foods (high-fat meats and fish, dairy, etc) is limited. A ripe avocado will yield to a gentle pressure when held in the palm of the hand and squeezed. The flesh is typically greenish yellow to golden yellow when ripe. The flesh enzymatic browning and turns brown quickly after exposure to air. To prevent this, lime or lemon juice can be added to avocados after they are peeled.
The avocado is very popular in vegetarian cuisine, making an excellent substitute for meats in sandwiches and salads because of its high fat content. The fruit is not sweet, but fatty, distinctly yet subtly flavored, and of smooth, almost creamy texture. It is used as the base for the Mexican dip known as guacamole, as well as a filling for several kinds of sushi, including California rolls. Avocado is popular in chicken dishes and as a spread on toast, served with salt and pepper. In Brazil and Vietnam, avocados are frequently used for milk-shakes and occasionally added to ice cream and other desserts. In Brazil, Vietnam, the Philippines and Indonesia, a dessert drink is made with sugar, milk or water, and pureed avocado. Chocolate syrup is sometimes added. In Australia it is commonly served in sandwiches, often with chicken. In Ghana, it's often eaten alone in sliced bread as a sandwich.
In Mexico and Central America, avocados are served mixed with white rice, in soups, salads, or on the side of chicken and meat. In Peru avocados are consumed with tequeños as mayonnaise, served as a side dish with parrillas, used in salads and sandwiches, or as a whole dish when filled with tuna, shrimps, or chicken. In Chile is used as a puree in chicken, hamburgers and hot dogs, and in slices for celery or lettuce salads. The Chilean version of caesar salad contains large slices of mature avocado. In Kenya, the avocado is often eaten as a fruit, and is eaten alone, or mixed with other fruits in a fruit salad, or as part of a vegetable salad.
The fruit was the basis for the original alcoholic drink Advocaat, made by the Dutch population of Suriname and Recife, with the name deriving from the same source.
Nutritional value
About 75% of an avocado's calories come from fat, most of which is monounsaturated fat. Avocados also have 60% more potassium than bananas. They are rich in B vitamins, as well as vitamin E and vitamin K.[18] They have the highest fiber content of any fruit - including 75% insoluble and 25% soluble fiber.[19]
A fatty triol (fatty alcohol) with one double bond, avocadene (16-heptadecene-1,2,4-triol), is found in avocado.[20]

2 comments:

Living Day to Day with Multiple Sclerosis said...

Oh Good!!! I love Avocado's and would eat them all day long if I could. I didn't know they were good for you I was always told that they weren't good fro me!!!

Rhapsody said...

Blessings,

know they are good, hate them anyway. Grew up with them had a big avacado in the yard and they grew very big not like they have here which is small. It's very popular in the Islands, its a much loved vegetable, still hate it..lol, lol.lol.